Tag Archives: mediterranean-diet

Mediterranean diet wins again, helps bones

(CNN)The Mediterranean diet is well-known for its health benefits on your heart and waistline, but now your bones could benefit too, according to a new study published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

In this study, researchers examined whether diet quality affects bone health in postmenopausal women. They found that women who ate a Mediterranean diet were slightly less likely to suffer from hip fractures.
    The Mediterranean diet is relatively easy to follow. It involves eating vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans and peas, unrefined grains, olive oil and fish. You should limit the amount of meat, dairy, and saturated fat you eat, but on the bright side you can have a glass of red wine at dinner.
    “Our results provide assurance that widely recommended eating patterns do not increase the risk of fractures,” said lead study author Dr. Bernhard Haring of the University of Wurzburg in Germany. “This being said, the average woman should follow a healthy lifestyle which includes adopting a healthy dietary pattern and being physically active.”
    Osteoporosis-related fractures are a major burden for health care systems in aging societies, with women particularly affected, said Dr. Haring. Current research results have been inconclusive about whether intake of nutrients involved in bone metabolism can prevent fractures.
    However, the results of this study suggest that a healthy diet, specifically a Mediterranean diet, might play a small role in maintaining bone health in postmenopausal women.

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    This latest Mediterranean diet research builds on previous evidence that your health might benefit if you follow this diet. It’s been shown that the Mediterranean diet can keep your brain young, help you live longer, manage your weight better, and lower your risk for cancer and cardiovascular diseases.
    “At the present time, the U.S. health system almost entirely ignores nutrition in favor of pharmacology and is hugely expensive and ineffective compared with the systems in other countries,” wrote Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard School of Public Health, in a related commentary. “Integration of the Mediterranean diet and related dietary patterns into medical practice, hospitals, schools and other institutions has the potential to improve well-being.”

    Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/28/health/mediterranean-diet-wins-again-helps-bones/index.html

    The Mediterranean diet could prolong lives in the UK, study finds

    Bust out the olive oil, fruits and veggies turns out eating a Mediterranean diet could help save lives.

    Results of a new study performed in Norfolk, England suggested that following a Mediterranean diet could prevent over 19,000 deaths a year in the UK.

    Though health benefits associated with Mediterranean diets in the Mediterranean region are well-known, this study sought to establish whether the diet could improve health if it were to be adopted by people living in other areas, such as the U.K.

    The study, published in the journal of BMC Medicine on Thursday, gathered data on eating habits of around 24,000 people in Norfolk for 12 to 17 years, beginning in the 1990s. The researchers ultimately found that 12.5 percent of heart attack and stroke-related deaths that occurred in the UK could have been prevented by dietary changes, if their findings are generalizable across the UK population and the assumption of a diet-driven causality of heart attacks and strokes is correct.

    The study therefore suggests, but does not conclusively find, that a whopping 19,375 deaths could be preventable in the UK if people were to adhere more closely to the Mediterranean diet.

    Though the word “diet” often leads to thoughts of sacrificing beloved foods, the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid shows that you can still eat some of your favorite foods daily, like bread, for example. People who follow this food regimen can also eat sweets, starches and meats in moderation, and even enjoy an occasional glass of wine.

    Image: <a href=”http://mediterradiet.org/nutrition/mediterranean_diet_pyramid”>Mediterranean Diet Foundation</a>

    Researchers made use of the pyramid’s guidelines during the study to determine a points system for each food family. Once they determined the top possible score was a diet containing 15 Mediterranean elements, they noticed that the maximum score amongst study participants was 13.1 and the lowest was 3.

    After looking at additional factors such as smoking, weight and physical activity, they determined that people who incorporated more Mediterranean diet elements into their lives were less likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease.

    Nita Forouhi, an author of the study from the MRC Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge, confirmed that adopting the eating habits of the Mediterranean diet has its health benefits. Forouhi told The Telegraph: “Encouraging greater adoption of the Mediterranean dietlooks like a promising component of a wider strategy to help prevent cardiovascular disease, including other important factors such as not smoking and maintaining a healthy weight, blood cholesterol and blood pressure.”

    Ian Johnson, a nutrition researcher and emeritus fellow at the Institute of Food Research who was not involved in the new study,told The Telegraph, “This is a careful and rigorous study showing a relatively small but potentially important association between higher adherence to aMediterraneanstyledietand reduced risk of incident heart disease, and death from heart disease.”

    Read more: http://mashable.com/